Wild Animals: Coati




Do you know about the wild animals named Coati? Yes, the very word “Coati”, generally used to describe coward, came from these creatures. Coatis are small mammal related to the raccoon. There are two species of these wild animals. Among them, one is native to Central and South America and parts of Arizona and Texas, and the other inhabits in Brazil.

The coatis are distinguished by their facial masks and long, pointed muzzle. They also have a ringed tail, which is carried erect. Usually they weigh around ten to fifteen pounds. The adults are three to four feet long, including a twenty to twenty-five inch tail. The color of these wild animals is reddish-brown above and yellowish-brown below.

 

Wild animals: Coati

Wild animals: Coati

Coati has a keen sense of smell and uses its nose to dig up insects and snakes. These wild animals feed on mice, ground squirrels, and bird eggs. Their long, arced claws are used for climbing and fighting.

Coatis live in tribes of five to twenty animals of several families, headed by a mature female. They live in small caves in cliff walls or in nests of vines and leaves on tree branches. Females give birth to two to six young about seventy seven days after mating.
Although they are pretty timid, still they growl, hiss, and bark when alarmed. When provoked, or for defense, coatis can be fierce fighters. Their strong jaws, sharp canine teeth and fast scratching paws, along with a tough hide sturdily attached to the underlying muscles, make it very difficult for potential predators to seize these smaller wild animals.

 

Wild animals: Coati

Wild animals: Coati

These wild animals can be domesticated eventually and make good house pets. As Coatis are wild animals, they are somewhat difficult to control or train in some cases. Generally behave in a manner radically different from that of a pet dog.
In the wild, coatis live for about seven to eight years. While in captivity they can live for up to fifteen years.